Talking to Children about Tragedy


Tips for speaking to your children about tragedies such as shootings, mass disasters, natural disasters.

US National Archives kids

Photo courtesy of National Archives

Unfortunately there have been shootings and other tragedies in many communities, large and small, in America. Children and teenagers are affected by disasters and tragedies just as are adults.

The most important thing that a parent can do is ask the child or teen his or her understanding of the tragic event, so that the child feels comfortable expressing emotion. Silence suggests to the teen that the subject is too awful to even discuss, even though of course, the teen is thinking and worrying about the event. Start by gently correcting any misconceptions. You don’t have to describe the event in detail, but allowing the child or teen to discuss her feelings is important.

Parents think toddlers don’t understand what they see on television, but toddlers recognize the emotions their parents are feeling. Preschool children may regress in their behavior and become more clingy. They may start sucking their thumbs, or wetting the bed. Other toddlers may act out. Strong emotions bring out strong behavior. When toddlers, preschool, and school age children see the disaster or tragic event on television, they think the event is occurring again and again. Keeping the television off to prevent retraumatization is helpful. Recording television programs and reviewing the broadcasts before the children see it can be helpful. Watching the television with your child so he can ask questions is also helpful.

School age children may also either act out or regress in their behavior. Sleeping in parents bed or skipping chores for a day or two is okay! It allows the child to feel more secure and safe. Security is a huge concern for children. Make sure they know that measures have been taken by law enforcement or the community, or that your family has a safety plan.

With teens, they may feel that life is meaningless and may take more risks than normal. Watch for this type of behavior because risky behavior can affect the adolescent in a significant way. Discussing positive actions carried out by heroes or bystanders can also be helpful. The teen may want to be closer to their parent for a period of time, to feel safe, and that is fine. Trouble sleeping and a decline in grades (transiently) can also occur. Some teenagers may try to avoid the people and situations that occurred at the time of the tragedy because these triggers cause

If your child or teen continues to have negative feelings and depression after 2 weeks, professional consultation with a physician, psychologist, or counselor will be helpful.

Last updated by Dr. Vee on October 22, 2015.

Antibiotic Overuse and the Development of Resistant Bacteria


WJXT Channel 4 Jacksonville CDC reports resistant bacteria pose serious threat to people.

The Centers for Disease Control has a new classification of the threat levels of different types of resistant infections. The most serious bacterial infections, which are very hard to treat, are carbapenem resistant enterobactereciae, Clostridium difficile and resistant strains of gonorrhea. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that more than 2 million Americans develop antibiotic-resistant infections each year and 23,000 die of the infections.

Bad Bacteria CartoonDoctors and patients can reduce the development of resistant strains of bacteria by limiting antibiotic use to illnesses that truly warrant treatment. Examples of infections that generally do not require antibiotics include upper respiratory infections. Patients should complete the entire course of antibiotics when prescribed. Stopping early or taking someone else’s antibiotic can increase the chance of developing resistant bacteria.

When you take an antibiotic, a certain number of bacteria develop resistance. These can overgrow and spread the resistance to other bacteria. When antibiotics are used, they kill bacteria throughout the body. When the beneficial bacteria in the gut are killed, serious bacterial infections, such as Clostridium difficile, can occur. Fluorescent green probioticsTalk to your doctor to see if an antibiotic is truly needed for your condition.

Resistant bacteria are in our meat supply, especially when animals are given antibiotics. Handwashing is the single most important measure to prevent ingesting these resistant bacteria. It is vital that you wash your hands before and after preparing raw meat, and don’t allow raw meat to come in contact with other foods. Washing hands after using the bathroom also helps prevent the spread of resistant bacteria.

Commonly missed areas of the hands with handwashing

Commonly missed areas of the hands with handwashing

Mayo Clinic Florida has patient safety and quality initiatives to prevent the spread of resistant bacteria and to decrease the number of hospital acquired infections.

Last updated by Dr. Vee on September 24, 2014

“Social at Mayo Clinic” YouTube Video Educates Mayo Clinic Employees about Social Media Best Practices


Entrance to Mayo Clinic Florida

Mayo Clinic Three Shields: Patient Care, Research and Education

Mayo Clinic FloridaBirdsall Medical Research Building

Using footage videotaped on his iPhone, Mayo Clinic Florida’s social media expert Jason Pratt developed a video viewed by all new Mayo Clinic employees about Mayo Clinic’s social media policy.

Video also highlights activities of Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, including their social media residencies (Jacksonville and Scottsdale) and social media summit (Rochester).

Mayo Clinic Florida

Fountain on Mayo Clinic Florida campus across from Davis Building

Social at Mayo Clinic 

Here’s the description of the video on YouTube:

Mayo Clinic Florida

Davis Building

“Mayo Clinic encourages professional and allied health staff to use social media tools appropriately and productively. This video, originally produced for Mayo’s new employee orientation program, provides guidance on behavioral expectations as well as links and information from the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media on additional

Mayo Clinic Florida

Mayo Building and Hospital

training resources available through its Social Media Health Network.”

Last updated on May 17, 2013 by Dr. Vee

@VeeMD

Dr. Vandana Bhide

English: Mayo Clinic Rochester Minnesota - Gon...

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Healthcare Social Media and Physician eProfessionalism Mayo Clinic Florida Grand Rounds


Slideshare Healthcare Social Media and Physician eProfessionalism Mayo Clinic Florida Grand Rounds Presentation

The Internet is like Vegas. What happens there stays there...forever. You can take it down but you can't take it back!

The Internet is like Vegas. What happens there stays there…forever. You can take it down but you can’t take it back!

Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media Residency Helps Me with Patient and Physician Engagment in Social Media


I am attending the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media residency in Jacksonville, Florida. Like most physicians, I am passionate about engaging patients in a collaborative dialogue about health and wellness. I work in the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic Florida. My goal is to help patients stay healthy enough to stay OUT of the hospital.

Mayo Clinic Social Media Revolution
Mayo Clinic Social Media Revolution

There is a dizzying array of health information on the web. It is overwhelming for both patients and physicians. How accurate is all that information? How should patients and physicians find accurate and user-friencly information relevant to their medical conditions? Which patient support group sites are valuable? How many have accurate health information?

I blog about health issues important to adult and children’s health. Unfortunately, I am “technology deficienct” so my goal for doing the social media residency is to learn in greater depth the “tools for social engagement.”

What I learned during the social media residency was best practices in using various social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, YouTube and wordpress blogs. Social media has limitless potential to advance patient and physician knowledge alike, and help them work collaboratively on medical care.

And I want to be part of the #Revolution!

–Vandana Y. Bhide, MD

View of Mayo Clinic Florida
Mayo Clinic Florida
 
Last updated on November 30, 2012 by Dr. Vee

Diane Morgan Recipe for Curried Pumpkin Hummus


MedHelp Healthy Curried Pumpkin Hummus Healthy Holiday recipe Vandana Bhide

Here is a healthy, low calorie holiday recipe developed by Diane Morgan. Pumpkin is a superfood, packed with vitamin A antioxidants and fiber. Chick peas are also a good source of protein and fiber. Remember to chop the garlic and let it sit for 5 minutes before adding to the dish to maximize its antioxidant properties. Garlic was once called the Russian penicillin due to its antimicrobial properties.

Curry powder contains turmeric, a powerful antioxidant (better yet make your own curry powder). Ginger aids digestion.

Serving size: 2 tbsp, Servings per recipe: 2 3/4 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp curry powder
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 can (15 oz/430 g) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can (15 oz/430 g) unsweetened pumpkin purée
  • 1 1/2 tsp finely minced fresh ginger
  • 1 1/2 tsp kosher or sea salt (I would eliminate this from recipe)
  • Optional garnish: toasted pumpkin seeds

Instructions:

1. In a small nonstick frying pan over medium heat, warm the oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the garlic and sauté just until beginning to soften, about 30 seconds. Add the curry powder and sauté, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute longer. Stir in the honey, remove from the heat, and set aside.

2. In the workbowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade, process the chickpeas until finely mashed. Add the pumpkin purée, ginger, salt, and the garlic mixture. Process until the hummus is smooth and puréed. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Transfer to a serving bowl. Cover and set aside for 1 hour to allow the flavors to meld. Garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds, if desired.

Dip Do-Ahead: This dip can be prepared up to 2 days in advance. Cover and refrigerate. Remove from the refrigerator 45 minutes before serving.

PER SERVING: 36 calories; 1.0g total fat (sat 0.1g, mono 0.5g, poly 0.2g); 1g protein; 6g carbohydrates; 2g fiber; 0mg cholesterol ; 0.7mg iron; 126mg sodium; 13mg calcium

CREDIT: Diane Morgan, Skinny Dips: 60 Recipes for Dips, Spreads, Chips, and Salsas on the Lighter Side of Delicious, Chronicle Books (2010).

Last updated on November 27, 2012 by Dr. Vee

My Friend Senator George McGovern–Gentleman and Statesman


Senator George McGovern Vandana Bhide

Senator George McGovern in his home in St. Augustine Florida

Senator George McGovern will be mourned, no matter what your political view. He lived part time in St. Augustine, Florida, the nation’s oldest city. He always returned to his hometown of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Senator McGovern kept a busy travel schedule. Three years before his death, at the age of 87, he had a book tour to promote his biography of Abraham Lincoln. Senator McGovern went skydiving for his 88th birthday! He was a tireless advocate of feeding children around the world, travelling to Africa in his later years to promote his cause. He attended the funeral of his vice presidential nominee, Sargeant Shriver.

English: Senator George McGovern signing his b...

English: Senator George McGovern signing his book “Abraham Lincoln” at the Richard M. Nixon Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He supported candidates in the North Florida area. Senator McGovern was a very outgoing man who loved to entertain in his home. He hosted opera singers from Gainesville for an evening of opera in his home. He was quick witted and loved to give speeches at his parties.

George missed his wife Eleanor, who died in 2007. He moved part time to St. Augustine in 2008.  He told me his only regret was not spending more time with his children. He wrote about his daughter who died of alcoholism. His other children are successful and well adjusted.

I and many others will miss George’s insights and humor. He has a lasting legacy on America.

Senator George McGovern's 88th birthday party

Senator George McGovern’s 88th birthday party

Last updated by Dr. Vee on October 23, 2012

How to Please a Picky Eater (Toddler or Teenager)


Top 5 Mistakes Parents Make with a Picky Eater

  1. Forcing a child to eat everything put on the table for a meal
  2. Bargaining with a child to eat healthy items in a meal in order to get a dessert or treat
  3. Not re-introducing a food item if the child doesn’t like it the first time
  4. Parents don’t eat healthy food themselves but expect their children to eat healthy food
  5. Stocking the refrigerator and pantry with junk food but expecting a child to choose healthy items over the non-nutritious snacks

1. Forcing a child to eat everything put on the table for a meal

  • A child doesn’t have to eat everything on the table, but should try at least one bite. If after the bite he says, “No, thanks” at least you’ve exposed the child to the new food.
  • Don’t force a child to eat an entire serving of something she doesn’t like, but don’t make a separate meal for the child
  • Remember, kids will not starve! They will learn to be more flexible with food choices rather than go hungry.
  • If a child skips a meal because he doesn’t like anything, the child will be hungry enough at the next meal to be more willing to eat what is served
  • Try to include at least one item the child likes at every meal, but don’t avoid all items the child does not like.
  • Don’t threaten or punish—this only results in power struggles with your child!

2. Bargaining with a child to eat healthy items in a meal in order to get a dessert or treat

  • Bargaining does not work long term to help the child learn to eat and enjoy healthy food such as vegetables.
  • It also promotes the false belief that a cookie or cupcake or other dessert item has more value than the healthy food item

3. Not re-introducing a food item if the child doesn’t like it the first time

  • The 10-15 Rule: Studies show that it can take up to 10-15 tastes of one kind of food before a child accepts or likes the food. Repetition is important!

4. Parents don’t eat healthy food themselves but expect their children to eat healthy food

  • Parents are the best role model for their kids. It helps if they eat the kind of food they want their children to eat. If parents don’t eat vegetables or fruits, chances are, their kids won’t either. 
  • If kids see their parents ENJOYING vegetables and fruits, they are more likely to choose to eat them as well.

5. Stocking the refrigerator and pantry with junk food but expecting a child to choose healthy items over the non-nutritious snacks

  • Don’t stock unhealthy items like candy. If a child is hungry, give her the choice of two healthy snacks to eat instead of giving in to the candy that she requested
  • Put healthy foods like cut up fruit where your toddler or teenager can quickly find them when they are hungry.
  • Avoid giving milk or juice before a meal to pacify hunger. This prevents kids from eating the rest of the meal
Home made macaroni and cheese, with some dried...

Home made macaroni and cheese, with cauliflower. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some ideas to encourage your kids to eat a healthier, wider variety of food:

  • It is normal for kids to eat less as they turn one year of age because of slowing of their growth at this age. At age two toddlers want to make their own food choices. Many toddlers appear to be picky eaters to parents because they don’t like to try new foods and prefer to snack.
  • It’s normal for kids to like one thing one day and not like it the next, or want the same food three days in a row and then say they are sick of it. In general, try to avoid preparing only the things a child eats—say prepared chicken nuggets, hot dogs and macaroni and cheese, to the exclusion of other food.
  • Involve your child in food shopping so that she can choose the vegetables and fruits she wants to try. Kids are more likely to eat a food they picked out. Remember not to bring your kids to the grocery store when they are hungry. Set ground rules in advance of shopping: no candy, no soda, no sugary snacks or cereal. They can choose any fruits and vegetables as long as they are willing to try them when brought home.
  • Involve your kids in making meals. They are more likely to eat the food “masterpiece” they made. Making cooking a fun experience will encourage kids to eat the food they cooked.
  • Kids are also more likely to eat food they have helped grow, so a having your child involved in a home garden or going to the farmer’s market will encourage them to eat more vegetables.
  • Avoid “grazing” all day long, because prevents a child from learning when he is hungry or full. Kids learn to manage their appetites by knowing when meals and snacks will be available.
  • Don’t encourage filling up on snacks, especially junk food or sugary snacks, because kids will learn to skip meals and eat only the unhealthy snacks.
  • Breastfed or formula fed babies should eat on demand because this is a period of high growth. Toddlers also need three meals and up to three snacks a day, so they should be encouraged to have a healthy snack before meals.
  • Let kids as young as 9 months of age feed themselves. Children should be able to use utensils by age 15-18 months. Having this control will help kids learn how much food it takes to fill them up and not overeat.
Healthy Berries are Good Food for Health

Photograph used with permission from epoSo.de

It is ok to disguise healthy foods in your kids’ favorite dishes:

  • Kids generally love pizza. Kids will eat vegetables like broccoli or spinach if it is on a pizza
  • Add a healthy vegetable like cauliflower to a kid pleaser like macaroni and cheese.
  • Add fruits or even vegetables to “milk shakes” Adding pre-frozen fruit to smoothies gives them a creamier texture similar to a milkshake.
  • Combine dried fruits, unsalted nuts and unsweetened cereal for a healthy snack mix
  • Make yogurt parfaits with fruit and granola. Even kids who won’t eat yogurt, fruit or granola separately tend to like them when they are served up as an appealing parfait.
  • Kids love peanut butter and jelly. Add peanut butter to celery sticks or apples for a healthy snack.
  • Add pureed vegetables like spinach to homemade hamburgers or turkey burgers
  • Add vegetables like squash or zucchini to spaghetti sauce. Kids tend to like pasta, so adding any vegetable to a pasta dish makes it more palatable to kids.
  • Add pureed cauliflower to mashed potatoes
  • Substitute sweet potatoes for French fries, and bake in the oven instead of deep frying.
  • Make baked vegetable “fries” or “fingers” by coating zucchini, eggplant or squash with egg substitute and bread crumbs
  • Make homemade baked chicken fingers coated with parmesan cheese and breadcrumbs instead of the fast food variety.
  • Légumes

    Photo credit: Wikipedia

    Carrots and corn are vegetables with high natural sugar content, so these are good vegetables to make in a pinch for picky eaters

Pay attention to the texture of foods or the way it is prepared. For example, some kids love applesauce but not raw apples.

Some kids will only eat vegetables if it is with a sauce, and others will eat only if there isn’t any sauce

Kids often prefer stir fried veggies (use a small amount of canola or olive oil) to steamed

  • Add vegetables like broccoli to a baked potato
  • Sometimes kids don’t like “mushy” foods. Cooking vegetables so they are tender-crisp may be more appealing to these children.
  • Yes, it is ok to add a small amount of ketchup or barbecue sauce to any food item including broccoli if it will encourage your child to eat the food item.
  • Make healthy whole grain waffle “sandwiches” (no syrup) containing lunch meat or vegetables inside. Use hummus or salad dressing as a spread inside the waffle.

Last Updated by Dr. Vee on October 22, 2012

  • English: vegetables

    (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Search for Google (Mount Rushmore Road Show)


Photograph of Mount Rushmore Courtesy of Ed James
 
“What do you think about dressing up as Abraham Lincoln for Halloween?” I asked my son. I thought I would dress up as George Washington, his friends could dress up as Thomas Jefferson and Teddy Roosevelt and we could start a Mount Rushmore Road Show.
 
My son rolled his eyes and said nothing. I was worried he might be on Facebook “unfriending” me or placing an ad on Craig’s List: “For Sale, Lame Mom. Uses whole sentences to text. Takes notes at Parent -Teacher conferences. No, It’s NOT ok to contact me with other services or commercial interests.”
 
Maybe his mind, like the American advertising community, had already moved past Halloween onto the critical Christmas shopping season, which starts directly after Back to School shopping season. (I am still trying to figure what to do with those ten protractors for $20* I bought in the Back to School Specials frenzy).
 
But no, he texted me, “i want 2 dress up as google toolbar.”
 
Naturally we started our Google costume search on Wikipedia. When I moved to the United States from India at age five, one of my most prized possessions was a complete set of the Encyclopedia Britannica. It took my parents a long time to save up enough money to buy me a set. In fact, I have kept the 1978 edition until this very day to peruse on those late nights when I don’t get 30 junk emails (Note: place Unsubscribe in subject line), 20 email newsletters from Mailchimp or a notice urging me, “Vandana, read LinkedIn’s update about Dr. Extraordinarily Smarter and More Accomplished than You and on the verge of winning a Nobel prize.” 
 
Next we searched Google for Google (my son on an iPad, me on my iPhone).  Apparently I wasn’t feeling lucky because the search yielded only sponsored sites selling skull and crossbones ice cube trays, toxic waste candy, zombie blood energy drinks, and ketchup/mustard packet baby costumes.
 
 We moved on to eBay. No Google toolbar costumes but we were able to bid on some Angry Birds Halloween costumes and Albert Einstein wigs.  We also auctioned off 10 protractors, shipping included anywhere in the continental United States.
 
I figured some industrious and creative parent had already thought of the Google costume and posted a How To video on Youtube, but no such luck.
 
Finally I went Amazon.com because one can buy ANYTHING on Amazon. I didn’t find a Google toolbar but I did find a couple of protractors (on sale for a mere 10 for $5 with $4.95  shipping!) to put on my Wish List. Those helpful folks at Amazon were kind enough to make some shopping suggestions based on items bought by people who also searched for protractors.Plus they offerred to give me $50 off this purchase if I apply for the Amazon credit card, guaranteed to never exceed an interest rate above 26.5%!
 
I clicked a flashing advertisement with the enticing tagline, “Come on over to the dark side with dark chocolate mini candy bars.” We learned there was 1 gram of fiber per 5 mini chocolate bars. So we only have to eat 150 candy bars to get the recommended daily intake of fiber.  My son thought the candy bars were practically a health food and plans on substituting them for broccoli.
 
Of course I had to pin the picture of fiber-full dark chocolate bars on Pinterest and then on my Facebook wall so that everyone interested could “Like” the Dark Side! I couldn’t leave Facebook (keep me logged on this computer, Check) without contacting the 5 friends with birthdays this month, see status updates on 22 friends, no lie, play a couple of games of word scramble, print out coupons for more protractors, check out friends tagged on photos, say “Maybe” to the 18 events to which I was invited by people I’m not sure I know,  “Like” the 400th “Baby’s first steps” pictures of someone I don’t recognize and whew, I am exhausted!
 
I told my son we absolutely had to get off the internet because we had exceeded the two hour screen time limit recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
 
Let’s see what Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, KevinMD and Dr. Oz are tweeting about (dark chocolate) and we’ll call it a night!
 
Ultimately, my son nixed the Mount Rushmore Road Show mother-son bonding idea (South Dakota or bust!) as well as the Google toolbar costume. I tweeted to the world @VeeMD “My son is dressing up as a Mad Scientist for Halloween and I am dressing up as a Petri dish.” (Less than140 characters.)
*when bought with qualifying $50 minimum purchase
 
Last edited on October 11, 2012 by Dr. Vee

Early Signs of Depression and Suicide Prevention


Dr. Vandana Bhide of the Mayo Clinic appears on the WJXT-TV news4jax.com Jacksonville, Florida 10:30 PM News show to discuss some of the warning signs of depression. Anyone, especially someone who has recently experienced a serious trauma such as an accident, illness, divorce, death, is at risk for depression. Sometimes people are afraid to ask if a person is depressed or has suicidal thoughts. Studies show that people who are questioned about their depressive or suicidal thoughts are often relieved to be able to finally discuss their feelings. This show of support may actually prevent someone’s suicide. Another telltale sign of depression is when someone is no longer interested in his or her usual activities. Too much or too little sleep, weight loss or weight gain can all be seen in depressed people. Don’t be afraid to ask someone if he or she is depressed, and urge the person to seek help from a health professional.

The Search for Google: A Commentary on Social Media in our Lives


The Search For Google (Mt. Rushmore Road Show)

Ever notice how pervasive the internet is in our daily lives? And how one can lose track of time for hours with a single web search? A recent example: Halloween Trick or Treating. An age old American childhood tradition. It started out innocently enough.  I simply asked my son, “What do you think about dressing up as Abraham Lincoln for Halloween?” He is studying American history in Social Studies class so I thought this would be a respectable Halloween character, avoiding commercialized blockbuster movie or pop culture idols. I thought I would dress up as George Washington, his friends could dress up as Thomas Jefferson and Teddy Roosevelt and we could have a Mount Rushmore Road Show. This did not go over big with my son.  He looked at me, rolled his eyes and said nothing. I was worried he might be on Facebook “blocking” me or placing an ad on Craig’s List, “For Sale, One Lame Mom. Rants against energy drinks.  Eats brown rice. Still uses whole sentences to text. Takes notes at Parent-Teacher conferences. No, It’s NOT OK to contact me with other services, products or commercial interests.” I checked Angie’s List and became concerned when I was not listed as a preferred vender (mother).

Later that day my son used the most common type of adolescent communication: he texted, “Mom Please don’t embarrass me in public.” (At least he said please.) I texted back “How about dressing up like Facebook?” “OMG LOL!” was his immediate reply.

I thought that maybe his mind, like the American advertising community, had already moved past Halloween onto the more important Christmas shopping season, which starts directly after Back to School shopping season (I am still trying to figure what to do with those ten protractors for $20* I bought in the Back to School Specials frenzy). But no, he then emailed, “I think I’d like to dress up as a Google toolbar.” And so started the search for Google. 

Of course, being internet savvy, he went directly to Wikipedia. When I moved to the United States from India at age five, one of my most prized possessions was a complete set of the Encyclopedia Britannica. It took my parents a long time to save up enough money to buy me a set. In fact, I have kept it until this day to peruse on those late nights when I don’t get 300 emails, 30 email newsletters from mailchimp or a notice urging me, “Read about Dr. Extraordinarily Smarter and More Accomplished than You and On the Verge of Winning a Nobel Prize’s updates on LinkedIn!” 

Today, it’s easier to search the internet than the Encyclopedia Britannica. So naturally we went to YouTube (My son on an I Pad, me on my IPhone) and searched, “How to dress up like Google toolbar. The search returned “Bert & Ernie try Gangsta-Rap.” We moved on to eBay. We put in a couple of bids for Einstein wigs after examining the complete 360 degree view of the hair.  Next we put up for sale 10 protractors, shipping included anywhere in the continental United States.

We even did an advanced search on Amazon (who was kind enough to offer me some suggestions of similar items that I might be interested in buying). I saved a couple of protractors (on sale for a mere 10 for $5 with $10 shipping!) on my Wish List and emailed the list to my relatives for Christmas present suggestions.  All courtesy of those helpful folks at Amazon.

We did a general search on “Healthy Halloween ideas” and were encouraged by advertisers to “Come on over to the dark side with dark chocolate mini candy bars.” The manufacturer told us that there was 1 gram of fiber per 5 mini chocolate bars. That means we only have to eat 150 mini candy bars to get the recommended daily intake of fiber.  After reading the label, my son thought the candy bars were practically a health food and plans on substituting them for broccoli! I find it annoying that manufacturers have jumped on the dark chocolate bandwagon (Fortunately they are interested in our health, not in their sales), trying to convince consumers that candy (of course when consumed “in moderation”) can be part of a sensible diet!

The manufacturer of this candy bar was even kind enough to provide a fascinating article on theobromine, “a compound closely related to caffeine that only has a mild stimulatory effect on the central nervous system.”  They told us, “Preliminary research indicates that even relatively high levels of theobromine does not interfere with attention or mood.”  For our further education, we find out that dogs metabolize theobromine very slowly and it “carries the same risk to dogs as coffee, tea, cola beverages and certain houseplants.”  I bet that piece of useful information was never included in the Encyclopedia Britannica! 

Of course I had to post that article on my Facebook wall so that everyone interested could “Like” theobromine! And I certainly could not leave Facebook (Keep me logged on, Check) without contacting the 5 friends with birthdays this month, see status updates on 22 friends, no lie, play a couple of games of word scramble,  learn how to make gazpacho from Bobby Flay (He might be traveling to my hometown for a Throwdown and I better be prepared!),  print out a couple of coupons for more protractors, start a new game of solitaire (advanced hand), say “maybe” to the 18 events I was invited to by people I’m not sure I know,  “Like” the 400th “Baby’s first steps” pictures of someone I don’t recognize (Baby’s Mom, who I don’t actually know, asked to “Friend” me on Facebook and I agreed, since one has to exceed 7 friends on Facebook in order to well, Save Face) and whew, I am exhausted!

I told my son we HAD to get off the internet because we had exceeded the two hour daily limit of screen time recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. But not before we found websites to buy skull and crossbones ice cube trays, sour flush toilet candy, toxic waste candy, tongue tattoos, zombie blood energy drink, and a ketchup packet baby costume.

I thought idly about “quickly” checking behind the scenes photographs of Lindsay Lohan’s  first day of community service as a morgue janitor (CNN Entertainment informed me that “Thursday was suppose to be Lohan’s first day of work as a morgue janitor, but she was sent away after showing up late for the morning’s orientation. Her publicist blamed her tardiness on a combination of not knowing what entrance to go through and confusion caused by the media waiting for her arrival.”) As an act of good citizenship, I recommended this on Facebook (along with 586 other people!) as well as shared it on Twitter. 

Next I had to check what those down to Earth Housewives of Beverly Hills are up to on their behind the scenes blog (shopping, shopping, nails, hair, shopping, Spa, shopping, restaurants, shopping).  Learn about the newest medical breakthroughs on “The Doctors” (Who needs Mayo Clinic Proceedings?), Check. Let’s see what Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, Deepak Chopra, KevinMD and Dr. Oz are tweeting about (dark chocolate) and we’ll call it a night.

Fortunately, I am pleased to report that my son did not dress up like Tron, Harry Potter (Ok, I admit that’s who he was last year), Charlie Sheen, any vampire from Twilight, Jack Sparrow (SO last year) or an IPad 2. (Why dress up as an IPad 2 when one only has to enter 5 or 6 thousand internet advertising contests in order to have a “chance” to win one?)  He also nixed the Mt. Rushmore Road Show mother-son bonding idea (South Dakota or bust!) as well as, ultimately, the Google toolbar costume (If it’s not found on YouTube it can’t be worth making). I tweeted to the world @VeeMD “My son is dressing up as a Mad Scientist for Halloween and I am dressing up as a Petri dish.” (Less than140 characters.)

*when bought with qualifying $50 minimum purchase

Updated on October 30, 2011 by Dr. Vee

Restriction Elimination Diet Helps ADHD Without Medication


Photographs courtesy of epSos.de

The INCA study was a placebo controlled study carried out in the Netherlands that showed a hypoallergenic diet helps treat hyperactivity, inattentiveness and oppositional defiant behavior (such as temper tantrums!) in children not on stimulant medication.

The restriction elimination diet included turkey, lamb, rice, water, salt and pepper, and many vegetables, including cauliflower and cabbage. Children were then challenged with foods, added back one by one, to see which foods caused worsening attention and behavior symptoms. Surprisingly, foods that worsened symptoms in an individual child did not correlate to high IgG immunoglobulin levels as would be expected in food allergy/intolerance. IgE allergy to food was not tested. The authors recommend that food allergy testing not be used to guide food therapy in children with ADHD, instead eliminating food that clinically caused problems in a particular child.

The details of the restriction elimination (RED) diet and the Food Journals used by families enrolled in the study are included n the appendix of the journal The Lancet.

An important detail of this study is that all children were screened to determine if they actually met criteria for ADHD, were of school age and did not take any stimulant medication.

Remember that many kids with ADHD have been found to have zinc deficiency, so it is a good idea to supplement with a multivitamin/mineral. High doses of zinc are not recommended.

Here is my WJXT Morning Show interview discussing a hypoallergenic diet and ADHD.

Reference:

Dr Lidy M Pelsser MSc, Klaas Frankena PhD, Jan Toorman MD, Prof Huub F Savelkoul PhD, Prof Anthony E Dubois MD, Rob Rodrigues Pereira MD, Ton A Haagen MD, Nanda N Rommelse PhD, Prof Jan K Buitelaar MD. Effects of a restricted elimination diet on the behaviour of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (INCA study): a randomised controlled trial. The Lancet, Volume 377, 5 February 2011 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62227-1.

Last updated by Dr. Vee on October 22, 2012

Run and Eat–Race for the Taste 5K Run to Benefit EPIC Community Services


The first ever Race for the Taste 5K run was this past weekend. We had over six hundred runners and they were amazingly fast!!!! The setting was beautiful Anastasia State Park, where runners had a great view of the ocean as they ran!

The runners then had free admission to the Taste of St. Augustine, where people could sample different food items and vote for their best in category.

Thanks to Dr. Pineau and everyone at Borland-Groover Gastroenteroloy Clinic for being title sponsor. Orthopedic Associates of St. Augustine, Dr. Marema/Koppman and OB/GYN Associates of St. Augustine were other key sponsors, making this Race incredibly successful! I had fun creating and sponsoring the Runner’s bags (Featuring Ask Dr. Vee, your Holistic Medicine Expert). I also had fun (but was stressed to the max) handing out water to the runners during the race!

Local celebs who ran in the race (and were fashionably dressed to boot, and did not sweat at all despite the 84 degree Florida heat) were too numerous to list, but included Bill Abare (former EPIC Community Services President), Dr. Ram Eyyunni, Dr. Ben Pineau (and son, who runs faster than me!) and Dr. Bill Platko.

All proceeds went to EPIC Community Services, which strives to help patients and families battling addiction through Education, Counseling, Intervention and Prevention.

This year I am Vice President of the Board of EPIC Community Services and am getting on the job training from Bev Slough, St. John’s County School Board President and current EPIC Board of Directors President. Patrick Canan, former EPIC President, and local attorney, did not dress up like Elton John, but he was a sponsor of the Taste of St. Augustine.

Patrick of Gypsy Cab (yummy hummus!) and Lorna McDonald of Raintree Restaurant (yummy berry crepes) were there to help St. Augustine become more tasty.

Thanks to all the great restaurants who were there, Patti Greenough and Teresa Andrews who worked tirelessly to make the event successful!

Rebecca Romaine, was EPIC in helping mastermind such a fantastically successful race. Valerie Lee was the water gal–we are already planning on how to improve our water skills for next year (ok, yeah, garbage cans for the water cups would have been an obvious idea. Also, some of the cups were flimsy. Who knew that you had to test run the cups in advance???) Fortunately, Tara Smith-Vighetti and
Renee Wauldron were there to help pour and hand out water cups during the race!

Preparation, preparation, preparation!

Last updated April 28, 2010 by Dr. Vee

Margin Players–The Shadow of the Pelican


Pictures Courtesy of Joe Marx, President for Life, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Executive Officer, Personal Chef, Soccer Coach for Margin Players

What a perfect oceanfront theater!  Right in the former Marjorie Kinan Rawlings beachhouse.  Written by Dr. Ruth Streeter, starring Ginny Gladu, Ted Gladu, cameo by Rob Steiner.
Last edited by Dr.Vee on April 20, 2010