Diane Morgan Recipe for Curried Pumpkin Hummus


MedHelp Healthy Curried Pumpkin Hummus Healthy Holiday recipe Vandana Bhide

Here is a healthy, low calorie holiday recipe developed by Diane Morgan. Pumpkin is a superfood, packed with vitamin A antioxidants and fiber. Chick peas are also a good source of protein and fiber. Remember to chop the garlic and let it sit for 5 minutes before adding to the dish to maximize its antioxidant properties. Garlic was once called the Russian penicillin due to its antimicrobial properties.

Curry powder contains turmeric, a powerful antioxidant (better yet make your own curry powder). Ginger aids digestion.

Serving size: 2 tbsp, Servings per recipe: 2 3/4 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp curry powder
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 can (15 oz/430 g) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can (15 oz/430 g) unsweetened pumpkin purée
  • 1 1/2 tsp finely minced fresh ginger
  • 1 1/2 tsp kosher or sea salt (I would eliminate this from recipe)
  • Optional garnish: toasted pumpkin seeds

Instructions:

1. In a small nonstick frying pan over medium heat, warm the oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the garlic and sauté just until beginning to soften, about 30 seconds. Add the curry powder and sauté, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute longer. Stir in the honey, remove from the heat, and set aside.

2. In the workbowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade, process the chickpeas until finely mashed. Add the pumpkin purée, ginger, salt, and the garlic mixture. Process until the hummus is smooth and puréed. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Transfer to a serving bowl. Cover and set aside for 1 hour to allow the flavors to meld. Garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds, if desired.

Dip Do-Ahead: This dip can be prepared up to 2 days in advance. Cover and refrigerate. Remove from the refrigerator 45 minutes before serving.

PER SERVING: 36 calories; 1.0g total fat (sat 0.1g, mono 0.5g, poly 0.2g); 1g protein; 6g carbohydrates; 2g fiber; 0mg cholesterol ; 0.7mg iron; 126mg sodium; 13mg calcium

CREDIT: Diane Morgan, Skinny Dips: 60 Recipes for Dips, Spreads, Chips, and Salsas on the Lighter Side of Delicious, Chronicle Books (2010).

Last updated on November 27, 2012 by Dr. Vee

The Search for Google (Mount Rushmore Road Show)


Photograph of Mount Rushmore Courtesy of Ed James
 
“What do you think about dressing up as Abraham Lincoln for Halloween?” I asked my son. I thought I would dress up as George Washington, his friends could dress up as Thomas Jefferson and Teddy Roosevelt and we could start a Mount Rushmore Road Show.
 
My son rolled his eyes and said nothing. I was worried he might be on Facebook “unfriending” me or placing an ad on Craig’s List: “For Sale, Lame Mom. Uses whole sentences to text. Takes notes at Parent -Teacher conferences. No, It’s NOT ok to contact me with other services or commercial interests.”
 
Maybe his mind, like the American advertising community, had already moved past Halloween onto the critical Christmas shopping season, which starts directly after Back to School shopping season. (I am still trying to figure what to do with those ten protractors for $20* I bought in the Back to School Specials frenzy).
 
But no, he texted me, “i want 2 dress up as google toolbar.”
 
Naturally we started our Google costume search on Wikipedia. When I moved to the United States from India at age five, one of my most prized possessions was a complete set of the Encyclopedia Britannica. It took my parents a long time to save up enough money to buy me a set. In fact, I have kept the 1978 edition until this very day to peruse on those late nights when I don’t get 30 junk emails (Note: place Unsubscribe in subject line), 20 email newsletters from Mailchimp or a notice urging me, “Vandana, read LinkedIn’s update about Dr. Extraordinarily Smarter and More Accomplished than You and on the verge of winning a Nobel prize.” 
 
Next we searched Google for Google (my son on an iPad, me on my iPhone).  Apparently I wasn’t feeling lucky because the search yielded only sponsored sites selling skull and crossbones ice cube trays, toxic waste candy, zombie blood energy drinks, and ketchup/mustard packet baby costumes.
 
 We moved on to eBay. No Google toolbar costumes but we were able to bid on some Angry Birds Halloween costumes and Albert Einstein wigs.  We also auctioned off 10 protractors, shipping included anywhere in the continental United States.
 
I figured some industrious and creative parent had already thought of the Google costume and posted a How To video on Youtube, but no such luck.
 
Finally I went Amazon.com because one can buy ANYTHING on Amazon. I didn’t find a Google toolbar but I did find a couple of protractors (on sale for a mere 10 for $5 with $4.95  shipping!) to put on my Wish List. Those helpful folks at Amazon were kind enough to make some shopping suggestions based on items bought by people who also searched for protractors.Plus they offerred to give me $50 off this purchase if I apply for the Amazon credit card, guaranteed to never exceed an interest rate above 26.5%!
 
I clicked a flashing advertisement with the enticing tagline, “Come on over to the dark side with dark chocolate mini candy bars.” We learned there was 1 gram of fiber per 5 mini chocolate bars. So we only have to eat 150 candy bars to get the recommended daily intake of fiber.  My son thought the candy bars were practically a health food and plans on substituting them for broccoli.
 
Of course I had to pin the picture of fiber-full dark chocolate bars on Pinterest and then on my Facebook wall so that everyone interested could “Like” the Dark Side! I couldn’t leave Facebook (keep me logged on this computer, Check) without contacting the 5 friends with birthdays this month, see status updates on 22 friends, no lie, play a couple of games of word scramble, print out coupons for more protractors, check out friends tagged on photos, say “Maybe” to the 18 events to which I was invited by people I’m not sure I know,  “Like” the 400th “Baby’s first steps” pictures of someone I don’t recognize and whew, I am exhausted!
 
I told my son we absolutely had to get off the internet because we had exceeded the two hour screen time limit recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
 
Let’s see what Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, KevinMD and Dr. Oz are tweeting about (dark chocolate) and we’ll call it a night!
 
Ultimately, my son nixed the Mount Rushmore Road Show mother-son bonding idea (South Dakota or bust!) as well as the Google toolbar costume. I tweeted to the world @VeeMD “My son is dressing up as a Mad Scientist for Halloween and I am dressing up as a Petri dish.” (Less than140 characters.)
*when bought with qualifying $50 minimum purchase
 
Last edited on October 11, 2012 by Dr. Vee

The Mediterranean Diet Health Benefits Revisited


Three red tomatoes lycopene mediterranean diet prevents cancerPhotograph courtesy of epSos.de

A recent study evaluated six different clinical trials involving 2650 overweight and obese patients around the world.  The Mediterranean Diet was found to be more effective in reducing weight, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting sugar and total cholesterol than a low fat diet.  

The Mediterranean Diet is known as a moderate fat diet, because a higher percentage of calories comes from fat than in a standard heart healthy diet where less than 30% of calories are from fat. However, the secret of the Mediterranean diet is not the percentage of fat but the type of fat consumed. Olive, canola, sunflower, safflower, soybean and peanut oil commonly eaten in the Mediterranean regions are all mono and poly unsaturated oils, which are healthier than saturated and trans (partially hydrogenated vegetable oils). Monounsaturated fatty acids (commonly abbreviated MUFA) are healthier than saturated fats, which are found in animal fat products such as butter and tropical oils.  Avocados are another source of MUFA.

Nuts, another integral food consumed in Mediterranean countries, provide heart-healthy omega 3 fatty acids.

Fish, a leaner protein than red meat, is a major component of the Mediterranean Diet.  Fatty fish like salmon, halibut, herring, black cod and sardines have high levels of omega 3 fatty acids, which support healthy memory and aging, and prevent heart disease. Interestingly, omega 3 fatty acids modestly increase LDL ( bad cholesterol), but they are beneficial in preventing heart disease and stroke because they prevent platelet stickiness and help lower blood triglyceride levels. Omega 3 fatty acids also reduce the risk of sudden death by preventing heart dangerous types of heart rhythm abnormalities.Mykonos Crete Mediterranean Diet Madelaine Bulkes Made B

Photograph Courtesy of Madelaine Bulkes

The Standard American Diet or SAD (pun intended) has large amounts of red meat, fried foods, processed grains, cured meats, and sugary sweets and beverages.  In contrast, the Mediterranean Diet is plant-based, with up to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily. 

Whole grains are another important feature of the Mediterranean Diet. Bread is eaten plain or dipped in olive oil.  Avoid butter, which has saturated fat, and margerine, which contains trans fat made by partially hydrogenating vegetable oils. Whole grains take longer to digest so they prevent sharp increases in blood sugar after meals. 

Americans more commonly eat processed grains, which have the outer covering of the grain removed.  Remember that whole wheat bread is not made of whole grain; instead it is made out of processed wheat flour (but still has more fiber than white bread). Whole grains have more fiber and are healthier for the colon than processed grains. A high fiber diet can reduce the risk of diverticulosis and colon cancer.  It takes more calories to digest whole grains than to digest processed grains.  A diet high in fiber can also lower blood  cholesterol levels. The Mediterranean Diet have high amounts of soluble (beans, legumes, cracked wheat)  and insoluble (fruits, vegetables, oat bran) fiber.

Substitute a whole wheat version of your favorite pasta, and remember to cook it al dente (not soft) in order to prevent increases in blood sugar after eating.

red wine mediterranean diet mark phillips Timba LimberRed wine in moderation is acceptable in the Mediterranean Diet. However, if more than 5 ounces per day in women or 10 ounces a day in men is consumed, the benefits of the red wine are lost.  Women at risk for breast cancer or breast cancer

Photograph courtesy of Mark Phillips/Timba Limber

recurrence should consider restricting alcohol intake since this factor has been associated with breast cancer occurrence.  It is believed that the benefits of red wine to the heart are through the antioxidant action of the phytonutrient resveratrol, which is found in the skins of grapes. So the same benefits of wine can be achieved by eating red grapes or drinking pure red grape juice. 

Dr. Ancel Keyes and his colleagues (including Dr. Paul Dudley White, who later served as President Eisenhower’s heart doctor) developed the Seven Countries Study after World War II to evaluate the health of almost thirteen thousand middle-aged men in the United States, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Finland, Yugoslavia and Japan.  They discovered that people who ate a diet high in vegetables, fruits, legumes (beans, lentils), fish and whole grains were the healthiest. The healthiest men were the residents of Crete, who lived longer and had less heart disease than Americans in the post World War II era.  Dr. Keyes and his  associates hypothesized that it was the Mediterranean diet that the Cretans ate which contributed to their longevity and good health. The residents of Crete ate up to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily!

Studies have shown that the Mediterranean Diet decreases the risk of heart attack, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and death from all causes. Although there have not been any prospective randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trials (the gold standard for evidence based medicine) comparing the Mediterranean diet to the standard American diet or weight loss programs, a number of studies have shown that people who follow the Mediterranean diet are leaner than people who follow other diets.

Cruciferous vegetables (shaped like a cross when cut)  such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage and Brussels sprouts have antioxidants which prevent several kinds of cancer including breast and prostate.  Tomatoes have lycopene, an  antioxidant similar to vitamin A, which  reduces the risk of cancers such as breast and prostate. Cooking tomatoes or cooking with olive oil, such as in tomato sauce, increases the lycopene content.

The low sodium Mediterranean diet combined with the high potassium content of fruits and vegetables such as various greens, legumes, potatoes and squash helps lower blood pressure.  Spinach, almonds, lentils, broccoli, pumpkin and sunflower seeds are good sources of magnesium, another element essential to maintain good blood pressure.

The high fiber content of fruits, vegetables and whole grains stabilizes blood sugar and prevents diabetes.  Another benefit of fiber in the diet is that it keeps maintains a feeling of fullness, decreasing the temptation for eating unhealthy snacks when ravished! Mono unsaturated fats from foods such as avocados, olive oil and nuts increase the body’s ability to use insulin, which also decreases the risk of diabetes. 

Although nuts have healthy omega 3 fatty acids, they are composed of fat, so no more than a handful a day is recommended. Avoid salted or honey roasted nuts. Almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts, cashews and pistachios can be eaten as part of the Mediterranean diet.

Lean protein in the form of chicken and other poultry and fish (healthy portion  is checkbook cover size) are important components of the Mediterranean diet, and are consumed weekly. Red meat and pork is rarely eaten, no more than a few times a month, and in small portions (about the size of a deck of cards). Food is prepared simply, using fresh ingredients, without  sauces or gravies. Rosemary, garlic, thyme, basil and parsley are herbs commonly used in Mediterranean cuisine, and have been shown to have beneficial health effects.

Studies show that garlic decreases blood pressure and reduces risk of cardiovascular disease. Remember to allow cut garlic to sit out for at least 5 minutes before cooking, in order to retain its health benefits.

In the Mediterranean region, sweets are consumed infrequently (no more than twice weekly), and are usually made of natural sugars such as honey.  Aiming for a 75 calorie dessert is ideal. Sorbets, fruit and dark chocolate are the best dessert choices.

Low fat Greek yogurt, feta cheese, sardines, beans, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, spinach and kale are good sources of calcium.

Lentils, spinach, almonds, and poultry are good sources of iron. Eating citrus fruit or peppers provides vitamin C, which helps the absorption of iron in a meal. Lentils and beans are also good sources of potassium, magnesium, folic acid and soluble fiber. Soak beans and change the soaking water several times in order to decrease the gas producing substances in beans. Remember that beans are not a complete protein, meaning they lack some essential amino acids that the body must get through the diet; adding lean poultry and eggs provides these essential amino acids.  Egg yolks should be eaten no more than once a week due to the saturated fat content, but there is no limit to the amount of egg whites that can be consumed.

At least 30 minutes daily exercise or movement is a recommended part of the Mediterranean diet.

Finally, a very important component of the Mediterranean lifestyle is sharing food with friends and family. Enjoy the Mediterranean lifestyle, have a zest for life and improve health all at the same time!

Allain J. Nordmann, Katja Suter-Zimmerman, Heiner C. Bucher, Iris Shai, Katherine R. Tuttle, Ramon Estruch, Matthias Briel. Meta-Analysis Comparing Mediterranean to Low-Fat Diets for Modification of Cardiovascular Risk Factors. The American Journal of Medicine Volume 124, Issue 9, Pages 841-851.e2, September 2011.

Last updated on January 18, 2012 by Dr. Vee  Photograph courtesy of epSos.de

red raspberries frozen antioxidants

Super Foods for Kids


Photograph of Pumpkin Soup Courtesy of Egal


Superfoods are foods packed with higher than average nutrients and antioxidants to fight cancer and heart disease

1. Berries. Blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries and cranberries—rich in antioxidants.

• Chokeberries and elderberries (difficult to find) are berries with the greatest antioxidant content

2. Pumpkin—use canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix).

• Has antioxidants vitamin A, E and beta carotene.
• Use in pumpkin pancakes, soup, pumpkin ravioli (fun to make with the kids).

3. Dark Chocolate

• Avoid chocolate with refined sugar, milk fats and hydrogenated oils.
• Want high purity cocoa powder that is high in antioxidants. Avoid cocoa that has been alkalinized by the Dutching process (boils away nutrients). Label should state cocoa/dark chocolate has not been alkalized, has been dried and cold pressed rather than roasted.
• Should consist of at least 70% cocoa
• use cocoa butter instead of milk fats or hydrogenated oils
• contain natural, low glycemic sweeteners such as raw sugar cane rather than refined sugars

4. Nuts have omega 3 Fatty acids.

• Almonds and walnuts are the healthiest source. Almond butter.
• Child’s handful daily.

5. Popcorn—lots of fiber.

• Use unsalted and unbuttered.
• No more than three cup serving (not the huge bag at the theater!).
• It is better to pop popcorn yourself (and more fun with the kids!) than to eat pre-packaged microwave kind. Microwave containers have perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a fluorotelmer in the lining of the bag. Can leak into popcorn during microwave cooking. to infertility, liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Popcorn manufacturers have promised to voluntarily phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan. Accumulates in the body and stays there for years.
• Wait until age one to serve corn and age four for popcorn to avoid choking hazard

6. Antioxidant Lycopene in tomatoes (and tomato ketchup—does that make it a health food????).

•prevention of cancers of the prostate, pancreas, stomach, breast, cervix and lung
•prevention of heart disease
•Better available when tomatoes are cooked, packed in oil or in tomato juice (but these forms have high levels of sodium or dietary salt)
Whole wheat pasta with marinara sauce is a good source of lycopene

7.Cruciferous (like a cross) vegetables (cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel Sprouts)—steam lightly–nutrients remain even after cooking. (Nutritious value of broccoli INCREASES when cooked).

Vitamin C and K, beta carotene (powerful antioxidant converted to vitamin A in the body), iron, folic acid and potassium.

Contains phytochemicals which prevent cancer by preventing damage to cell DNA. Sulphorophanes prevent damage from carcinogens.

Broccoli sprouts have more sulphorophanes than bean sprouts.
Healthiest cruciferous plant is kale, which is a superfood because it is a great source of antioxidant vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, and micronutrients that help eye health (lutein and zeaxanthin). Mix a little in a fruit smoothie or mix in cooked dishes.

8. Beans/lentils-Black beans have the highest concentration of the antioxidant anthocyanin phytonutrients. Other beans with high levels of antioxidants include soybeans, navy beans, split peas, lentils, pinto beans and garbanzo beans.

•Can make soups and hummus.
•Packed with protein, complex carbohydrates (low glycemic index) and fiber.
•Good source of iron, magnesium, folate, calcium, potassium, and zinc. Use in hummus, soups.

9. Sweet potatoes
•twice the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A
•42 percent of the recommendation for vitamin C
•four times the RDA for beta carotene,
•When eaten with the skin, sweet potatoes have more fiber than oatmeal.
•130 to 160 calories for small to medium sweet potato
•Cinnamon added to sweet potato helps stabilize blood sugar.
•Sweet potato digests more slowly than white potatoes so they are lower glycemic load.

10.Whole grain breads instead of wheat or white bread. Whole grains are rich in fiber and vitamin E

•very low in fat
•The germ and outer coating in wheat and other grains has most nutritional value. Avoid refined grain foods such as white bread and certain breakfast cereals.
•Whole grains typically fortified with folic acid, B vitamins, iron, and zinc.me whole grain breakfast cereals contain added calcium and vitamin D, too.
•Give kids whole grain breakfast cereals instead of highly processed, sugary cereals. Use whole grain breads for toast and sandwiches, whole grain crackers for snacks, oat bran muffins.
•brown rice instead of white
•quinoa, buckwheat, barley
•whole wheat pasta.
•Add roiled oats to meat loaf

11. Red grape juice—has resveratrol (a flavenoid antioxidant that protects agains blood clots and heart disease) like in red red wine.

• Be careful of sugar—dilute with water and limit intake, especially in toddlers.
•Cranberries and pomegranate juice provides antioxidants, but be careful of the concentrated sugar in juices.

Fatty Cold Water Fish– heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

• Choose wild-caught Alaska salmon over farmed salmon. Farmed salmon has been shown to contain 10 times more toxins, including Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and dioxin, than wild salmon. Farmed salmon are fatter, and the PCBs are stored in this fat. In addition, salmon farms can harbor parasites. Some salmon farms use artificial colorings, which may be harmful to health.
• No more than two or three ounces fish/week for children between the ages of two and six years old.
• Canned tuna is composed of smaller tuna types such as skipjack and albacore (more mercury in albacore than white tuna). In general, the smaller the fish, the less potential for mercury.
• Stick with one tuna fish sandwich weekly in children
• Careful with tuna steaks (made from larger, older tuna which have accumulated mercury).
• Avoid fish such as grouper, tilefish, shark due to high mercury content

Last Updated by Dr. Vee on February 14, 2011

Top 12 Must-Have Items for a Senior’s Medicine Cabinet


1.  Advanced Directives–Also known as a Living Will.  Includes your determination of your Healthcare Surrogate, or who you want to make medical decisions for you. 

If you have a “DNR” form that specifies that you do not want paramedics to resuscitate you in the event your heart stops beating or lungs stop breathing, this should be prominently placed near the entrance of your home or attached to your refrigerator.

2.  List of your medications, including specific doses.  Include medication allergies, including any allergy to latex.

According to a survey by AARP and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), two-thirds of people aged 50 and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Less than one-third of those who use CAM talk with their doctors about it. Remember that supplements are not evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

The term Medicine Cabinet is used in the title of this article to emphasize the fact that supplements should be treated like other medicines. Share with your doctor any supplements you may be taking to find out any side effects or interactions with other medicines you may be taking.

3.  First Aid Kit with topical antibiotic, alcohol pads, gauze pads, paper tape, Ace wrap and bandages.

4.   I call Vitamin D the Superstar Supplement–studies suggest it may reduce the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes and certain cancers.   Vitamin D helps the absorption of calcium in the stomach.  Many more people are vitamin D deficient than previously known.  Vitamin D is important for healthy bones.  It helps the absorption of calcium in the stomach.

5.  Calcium is important to prevent osteoporosis or thinning of the bones.  Calcium supplements typically contain vitamin D as well. 

6.   Continuing this discussion about healthy bones, the combination of glucosamine and chondroitin were shown to improve the pain of moderate to severe arthritis, but was no better than placebo in mild arthritis in the GAIT study  funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

7.  Healthy joints may also benefit with omega-3 fatty acids, more commonly known as “fish oil.”  Studies show that omega-3 fatty acids may help patients with an inflammatory arthritis called rheumatoid arthritis. 

Omega 3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have also been found to improve memory. 

Fish oil is best known for helping increase the good cholesterol in the body and lowering  bad cholesterol and triglycerides (fats).  The best way to get omega 3 fatty acids is to eat fatty fish such as  salmon, sardines, tuna or mackerel twice a week. 

A landmark study conducted in Italy showed that omega 3 fatty acid supplementation after a heart attack helped reduce the risk of recurrent heart attacks.    The American Heart Association recommends 500 mg of omega 3 fatty acids daily for healthy people and 1 gm of omega 3 fatty acids for people who have known coronary artery disease. Check with your doctor before taking omega 3 fatty acids because they may increase the risk of bleeding.

8.   Cholesterol levels can also be improved by eating fiber in the diet.  The best sources of fiber are whole grains such as barley, oat bran or quinoa.   Fiber also helps prevent diverticulosis (small pouches inside the large intestine).   The more fat in the diet, the more diverticula that form.  They can become inflamed and infected and may even require surgical removal of part of the colon.    Some patients with irritable bowel syndrome or constipation benefit with fiber supplements in their diet. It is very important to drink lots of water when taking fiber supplements–approximately 64 ounces a day. 

9.    Probiotics are supplements that also help maintain good colon health.  Probiotics are microorganisms which replenish the good bacteria that normally live in our colon or large intestine.  Probiotics are especially helpful when you have a stomach virus or have to take antibiotics.

10.  A study carried out by Harvard Medical School researchers showed that regular use of aspirin after developing colorectal cancer decreased the risk of death from colon cancer.  The most common use for aspirin, though, is to prevent heart attack and stroke.  The U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) encourages men aged 45-79 to consider taking low dose aspirin to prevent heart attack. Women ages 55-79 should consider aspirin therapy to prevent stroke.

Like other blood thinners, aspirin should not be used by patients who have had bleeding ulcers, patients over the age of 80 (except under a doctor’s supervision), patients with bleeding strokes or people at high risk for falls.  Always consult your doctor before starting aspirin.

11.  Lutein is an antioxidant supplement which has been shown to  help slow down or prevent vision loss in patients with age related macular degeneration.   The macula is the part of the back of the eye called the retina which is involved in central vision.  

Age related macular degeneration leads to loss of central vision, sparing the peripheral vision. The macula is the part of the retina that is also most sensitive to blue light the part of the visible light spectrum that, along with ultraviolet light, can damage your eyes.  Sunglasses also prevent  penetration of blue and ultraviolet light to the macula.

12.  Sunblock SPF at least 15 should be used daily to exposed skin.  Broad spectrum sunblock prevents ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B rays.  UVA rays cause premature aging of the skin.  UVB rays can cause sunburns.  

Exposure to both types of ultraviolet rays can lead to the development of skin cancer, including melanoma, a very serious type of skin cancer.   Look for agents that contain titanium and zinc oxide. Most people do not use as much sunblock as needed to protect the skin.   One ounce, enough to fill a shot glass, is  needed to protect each of the exposed parts of the body. 

Sunblock should be rubbed into the skin, especially on the face, ears, arms and hands, 15-30 minutes before sun exposure.  It must be re-applied frequently, every two hours, even the water-resistant kind.   

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends daily use of sunblock to exposed areas of the body, not just on days you are out in the sun.   On cloudy days, up to 80% of the sun’s rays are still present to cause sun damage. This article is for informational purposes only and should not substitute for medical advice from your healthcare provider.

The author is not providing personal medical opinion, diagnosis or course of treatment. Do not delay or substitute this information for medical treatment.

Last updated May 1, 2010 by Dr. Vee